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How to get people to "buy in" to Active Learning processes?

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2 years 8 months ago #22 by Super User
Super User created the topic: How to get people to "buy in" to Active Learning processes?
How do you explain the process of Active Learning to parents, families, and staff to help them understand and "buy in" to the process so that they can carry over the learning when you're not there (especially if the child is older and the typical technique that has been used is grabbing the child's hand and making them explore)?
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2 years 8 months ago #23 by Super User
Super User replied the topic: How to get people to "buy in" to Active Learning processes?
Kate Hurst Responded:

"Leah,
Part of what we would like the Active Learning Space website to do is to be that tool for "showing" Active Learning at its best and also providing the information to explain the total approach. I explain to parents why their sensory loss and other disabilities caused the child to miss out on developing skills like a typical child. I think the best way to win them over is just to try it with their child...progress makes the case for you. The videos on LilliWorks.com where parents share about why they believe in Active Learning help. Also check out zerotothree.org for some neat videos that explain what happens for typically developing infants and toddlers at various ages. We hope to get some parent videos added to Active Learning Space this year!"
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2 years 8 months ago #24 by Super User
Super User replied the topic: How to get people to "buy in" to Active Learning processes?
Patty Obrzut Responded:

"Hi Leah,
Parents, family members and staff are active learners too. If I can have them participate in an activity that demonstrates my point - I find this works best.

You might try this activity.
Blindfold the individual and ask them to "act" like a child with special needs. For example, you can tell them they are in a wheelchair, unable to speak, unable to walk or move their chair in any way. Now have them explore objects in three ways.

First - don't give them anything for about 5-10 minutes. Then ask them what they have learned. This is an example of a passive learner - only knowing what is going on around them but having no control.

Second perform hand over hand on the person with three objects. Move quickly, and don't allow the person to "engage" in the activity. You decide how the person will touch the object. Make your movements more forceful and don't follow the lead of the blindfolded person. When done, ask the person how they felt about someone manipulating their body. Usually most people don't like it. They feel like they have no control.

Lastly, offer them a variety of objects to explore in the time that they want to explore. You can demonstrate how to perform a task or use and object - but don't take the person's hand and don't perform hand over hand. Now ask them about the objects and what they learned from their activity.

Usually this activity helps to make the point, that a child with a disability needs time to learn at his/her own pace. That the child does not want to be manipulated or controlled. That providing an active learning environment offers the best environment for continued learning.

I would also recommend showing videos from this site to help explain points and to visually show children using the equipment.

If all else fails, I find if someone does not understand my point, I simply start walking up to them unannounced during activities. I will grab the person's hands and will make them participate in an activity how I want them to participate. I ignore their movements or comments. Usually the person reacts poorly to this, and asks what I am doing. I stress that I am doing to them, what I see them doing to the child. We discuss their reactions and then relate these feelings to how the child must feel. Usually this works."
Moderators: Kate HurstCharlotte CushmanPatty Obrzut
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